Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Roads - Rails - Sidewalks - Bikeways
EOst
Capella Tower
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Location: Saint Paul

Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby EOst » February 23rd, 2021, 9:16 am

But still. People hate transfers, even if it's to another aBRT. And the eastsiders are much more likely to want to go to downtown St. Paul anyway.
Eastsiders won't lose direct-to-downtown options from Como-Maryland; the buses on Payne, Arcade, E 7th, etc. will continue to go downtown, and you'll have Rush Line and Gold Line on top. The people losing their one-seat ride to downtown (assuming Route 3A goes away, which is not clear) would be people on Maryland/Como between Rice and Snelling.

In fact, Como-Maryland *creates* a one-seat ride from most of the Eastside to downtown Minneapolis, which I think is a worthwhile trade-off.

StandishGuy
Block E
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Joined: January 29th, 2021, 4:24 pm

Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby StandishGuy » March 7th, 2021, 11:52 am

It will be great that many of major Minneapolis corridors will be served by ABRT by 2030 including Penn Ave N., Chicago Ave S., Lake St., Hennepin Ave, University/ 4th, and Central. However, it is so frustrating that so many other corridors that travel through dense, walkable places and have big populations of transit-dependent people will not get served with upgraded bus service in the next decade. Franklin Ave, Lowry Ave and Nicollet among others need better service now.

The recently approved Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan's Transit section was pretty underwhelming with few specifics. IMO the City should look into implementing a "Transit Benefit District" like they have in Seattle which has their taxpayers contributing extra funds to add bus service including higher frequencies.

Trademark
Nicollet Mall
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Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby Trademark » March 7th, 2021, 4:45 pm

It will be great that many of major Minneapolis corridors will be served by ABRT by 2030 including Penn Ave N., Chicago Ave S., Lake St., Hennepin Ave, University/ 4th, and Central. However, it is so frustrating that so many other corridors that travel through dense, walkable places and have big populations of transit-dependent people will not get served with upgraded bus service in the next decade. Franklin Ave, Lowry Ave and Nicollet among others need better service now.

The recently approved Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan's Transit section was pretty underwhelming with few specifics. IMO the City should look into implementing a "Transit Benefit District" like they have in Seattle which has their taxpayers contributing extra funds to add bus service including higher frequencies.
Why not make it city wide?

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NickP
Rice Park
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Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby NickP » March 9th, 2021, 8:48 am

Would a transit benefit district be like a city specific version of the CTIB?

Trademark
Nicollet Mall
Posts: 136
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Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby Trademark » March 9th, 2021, 10:40 am

Would a transit benefit district be like a city specific version of the CTIB?
If we continue to wait for the limited county transit tax to fund projects we want or intermittent state funding we will never have a transit system capable of inducing modal shifts.

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NickP
Rice Park
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Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby NickP » March 9th, 2021, 10:26 pm

I get that. I was just wondering if it would be a similar type of structure, just for the city as opposed to the county.

Trademark
Nicollet Mall
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Joined: March 31st, 2019, 11:22 am

Re: Arterial Bus Rapid Transit Corridors

Postby Trademark » March 9th, 2021, 11:17 pm

I get that. I was just wondering if it would be a similar type of structure, just for the city as opposed to the county.
Ya I think so. The Minneapolis city council is our friendliest elected body for transit by far. They are the most likely to approve a significant transit tax. Then they could pressure the suburban city councils by ending the new lines on their cities borders. If they approve the same higher tax that Minneapolis does then they will get routes going to them.

I'm working on trying to set up the math of what could realistically be raised by a city and what that could buy over the next 30 years. While aBRT is good we can do better. This money could also be used for bikeways and better sidewalks. I'll be posting my proposal here for feedback soon.

Half measures and a mixed traffic BRT-Lite every other year won't do it. We need to run our urban bus lines up to every 7.5 minutes and keep them out of traffic as much as possible. When the product is better people will buy in. The suburbs will be jealous and try and get their piece of the pie too as they see the economic benefits of a larger tax base. Bus riders will grow as a coalition and begin to hold real power and people in the suburbs will petition their leaders to join with the cities and connect good buses to them. Then we have the money to start to turn some of those buses into trains.

Right now we spend so much money and time appeasing the suburbs because they put into the transit tax so they get projects serving them that are less efficient. We fight for scraps for them and propose projects like BRT to Stillwater instead of Midtown LRT because we are scared they will take our money and leave. Why should we fight for their scraps when they are always stubborn, always late to trends but when something works they are desperate for a piece (see the rise in suburban centers decades after this was first popularized by strong towns and the CNU).

Drive ridership. Put transit where people use it. Fund real alternatives to make travel times competitive to driving. Meet our cities transit goals and practice what was preached in Minneapolis 2040.


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